“Physics advances one funeral at a time”

Here’s a fine article about astrophysics and scientific enquiry from Ethan Siegel: https://www.forbes.com/sites/startswithabang/2017/11/16/scientific-theories-never-die-not-unless-scientists-choose-to-let-them/#3ae8a4a24ccb

Mr. Siegel summarizes scientific investigation thus:

“When it comes to science, we like to think that we formulate hypotheses, test them, throw away the ones that fail to match, and continue testing the successful one until only the best ideas are left. But the truth is a lot muddier than that. The actual process of science involves tweaking your initial hypothesis over and over, trying to pull it in line with what we already know. It involves a leap-of-faith that when you formulate your theory correctly, the predictions it makes will be even more successful, across-the-board, than any other alternatives. And when things don’t work out, it doesn’t always necessitate abandoning your original hypothesis. In fact, most scientists don’t. In a very real way, scientific theories can never truly be killed. The only way they ever go away is if people stop working on them.”

Tweaking is the draw. And it truly is fun to discover when errors are in a hypothesis, as this offers the chance to discover and tweak further. This is happening with the 17th Century Atlantic Seaboard limestone smuggling hypothesis at my Cartoproblematica page. There’s an error in part of the geology. That’s neat. It means more discovery. And got me refocusing on another aspect of that same geology – narrowing the physical search area from ~1200 km2 down to 138 km2, and thence down to 4.5 km2.

  • – David Huer

Image: Churchyard – nige_hurll modified by D.Huer
https://pixabay.com/en/churchyard-gravestones-graveyard-2812800/
CC0 Creative Commons

 * Starts With A Bang “is dedicated to exploring the story of what we know about the Universe as well as how we know it, with a focus on physics, astronomy, and the scientific story that the Universe tells us about itself. Written by Ph.D. scientists and edited/created by astrophysicist Ethan Siegel, our goal is to share the joy, wonder and awe of scientific discovery.”

Hydrological Spreads update

From Columbia U.’s Ahmet-Hamdi Cavusoglu, Xi Chen, Pierre Gentine & Ozgur Sahin comes the proposition to harvest energy from evaporation. Could this bring “Hydrological Spreads” Financing to fruition?

News article: https://techxplore.com/news/2017-09-energy-harvested-evaporation-power.html?utm_medium=referral&utm_source=idealmedia&utm_campaign=techxplore.com&utm_term=68744&utm_content=2148428

Direct link: Ahmet-Hamdi Cavusoglu, Xi Chen, Pierre Gentine & Ozgur Sahin, Potential for natural evaporation as a reliable renewable energy resource, Nature Communications 8, Article number: 617 (2017), doi:10.1038/s41467-017-00581-w, Published online 26 September 2017.

 

Anticipated Future Value of Public Resources (AFVPR)


Upper Image Credit: Columbia University cf. techxplore.com article

Is our universe a “wormhole”?

Portal Vortex Time Travel Wormhole Warp Space{a set of (solutions of Einstein field equations)}, such that an outer “envelope” feeds a singularity at the “centre”?

About problem: Commenced thinking about the nature of neural networks and organization of orbital space some 30-years ago = liquid membraning helps; came to a hypothesis somewhere between 2010-2014; and decided to post it as a puzzle, along the lines of the diagramatic sequences they have for US college tests; and then publishing it on December 7, 2014. Not many takers except Clément Vidal at Vrije Universiteit Brussel. Clément and I have chats and he read my Bangivore hypothesis.

Puzzle published December 7, 2014.

if you look at the original diagram (select image to go there), there are fine protuberances along the edge of the black circle second from right.

New phrase: Would Kessler data cascades influence “multiverse billiards”? Data cascading is what happens when a thought-investigation (for me, at least) unlocks into a solution key or key-set. Which invariably splits into all sorts of interesting new questions.

Kessler cascades and collision sets are fascinating – applicable to neat problems like:

  * Neural nets (growth; and collapse ie. epilepsy?);
  * ocean garbage collecting into gyres (and then colliding down to be food for plankton?); and
  * the hypothesis I’m working on that floodwater/saltwedge “density differentials” produce a trigger transforming foreshore waters into a “saltwedge dam” that floodwaters rebound against

Links:
Puzzle (Dec-7-14): https://davehuer.com/puzzle-03/
Bangivores: https://davehuer.com/blog/prokaryote-starivores-bangivores/
“Wormhole”: http://maxpixel.freegreatpicture.com/Portal-Vortex-Time-Travel-Wormhole-Warp-Space-2514312: Creative Commons Zero – CC0.
Billard balls: By Andrzej Barabasz (Chepry) (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0) or GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html)], via Wikimedia Commons

Kessler cascades:
1) Donald J. Kessler retired from NASA in 1996 as NASA’s Senior Scientist for Orbital Debris Research.
1) http://www.spacesafetymagazine.com/space-debris/kessler-syndrome/don-kessler-envisat-kessler-syndrome/
2) http://iaass.space-safety.org/awards/jerome-lederer-space-safety-pioneer-award/space-safety-pioneer-award-hall-of-fame/kessler-biography/
3) Generated image of orbital debris estimate: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Debris-GEO1280.jpg

– end –

 

SOLCO: A new space treaty to break the Orbital Investing Sound Barrier

CityMoon : Getting back to the Moon

Earlier this summer, a friend and got to talking about space industry. Why industry and the authorities still had us stuck on Earth. It’s been 50 years. They played golf. And got us a bag of rocks. All the other promises were empty. And NASA keeps insisting that we ought to be making riskier long-duration trips to Mars vs. bootstrapping like entrepreneurs do. But got to thinking, concluding that the old Outer Space Treaty (UNOOSA, 1966) is the barrier to entry. The national space agencies really have little choice, because signatory states all agree that no one can own private property off-planet.

CityMoon.org : website
Treaty proposal video (CGI animation)

Well, who invests in that. 

The strategy here? A new treaty to break the investment log-jam. That’s been the project of the last few months. I will periodically post and welcome guest commentary.  It takes all of us to make the world better. And all of us dialoguing to move our civilization forward.

 

Antique Limestone Flagstones (Historic Decorative Materials of West Hatfield, MA)

I’ve been deep into map history sleuthing, putting up a remarkably forthcoming statement about the Horne Lake trail: Horne Lake – the Trail is the Lake. Also, the research, to date, of Col. Engineer Römer’s ca. 1698 Memorial & Mappe of his journey to 5 Indian Nations in Upper New York State. And a comment to my US friends and relatives about 1848. Why it is an Important Year for Canada (ought to be a National Holiday – maybe “Parliamentary Democracy Day”?), and the 2nd British Empire. Much more important to us than, say, 1776. Also gentle humour about the War of 1812. Which we won.

In the midst of all this, a remarkable find whilst reporting on the anomaly of “Nanhygansett Bay” limestone: a wonderful image of antique flagstones; from Historic Decorative Materials of West Hatfield, MA. This is an e-commerce site supplying aged French and Belgian floorings to the fine home building market. An incredibly neat line of products from merchant co-founders: Emmi & François Micallef

Cartoproblematica – History projects subsite

History projects: Now at Cartoproblematica
Projects: Thorough research to propose hypotheses, with the aim to collaborate with interested collaborators to test for reproducible (scientific, archaeologically-valid) evidence.
Notes and references: Added as time permits…

Activities since my last blog post: A LOT of reading, particularly about the Atlantic colonies (Acadia, New England, Newfoundland, etc) and international conflict in centuries past. From this, developing a hypothesis about the treasure in Mahone Bay being “lime” smuggled to Massachusetts until 1697. Developed after noticing an anomaly in the historical record, when looking for karst in Nova Scotia (karst is a type of landscape formed from soluble rock such as limestone, gypsum, marble, and anhydrite): http://davehuer.com/cartoproblematica/atlantean/maritime-puzzles/mahone-bay-treasures/research-notes/references-docs-data/

Discovering a lost First Nations trail

When caving…one of the ways to save time is to digitally survey before going into the bush.

One of my projects (from looking for historical reports for Horne Lake Provincial Park, which has an extensive cave network) has been tracing the lost trail and road network from Port Alberni to the east coast of Vancouver Island from colonial times to 1911, when the province surveyed and gazetted a road allowance.

Now, some success!

Independently finding two missing trails (Horne Lake and another trail), and a wagon road lost to memory since the 1870s/80s. Plus a portrait of Captain (later Admiral and Hydrographer) G.H.Richards, RN, commanding the 1857-64 survey of the coast, held in private hands. BC Crown agencies, local government, and all three local First Nations (Qualicum, K’omoks, Tseshaht) have periodically searched for the first Horne Lake trail map (1856), successor wagon road map (1872, active 1872-86) and associated reports for over 100 years. It took me 4 years and digitization helped. Thus far, I have physically visited 3 archives, but digitally…15 archives in 7 countries.

 

The 1872 took a few months in 2012 – not an easy find as BC united with Canada in 1871, and reports are missing for the years of administrative transition.

The 1856 took 4 years of thinking including ~3 months of research into the start of the backstory. Ruggles  (A Country Most Interesting, 1991) reports on the 1856 survey, but reference to the academic tome was not easy to notice at HBC Archives (1 line!), and only then found during a search for secondary sources after K’omoks FN’s archaeologist told me about another source, after finding the faint line of the trail on the HBC map myself – which is not cataloged to reference the trail.  BC Government, local government, and First Nations did not know about either map or the 1856 backstory. You’d need to know localities and the survey history to connect the dots.

I have some of this now – a complex tale of intrigue involving Hudson’s Bay Company (HBC), the slaughter of the Qualicum village on the eastern coast end of the trail by a Haida war party, the Imperial Government and the Colonial Office, the gold rush and the Crown’s legal claim to all gold in its territories, US designs on the Oregon Territory, 1856-72 US/British negotiations to resolve border issues and tensions that later drove events like the Pig War, John Jacob Astor’s Russian American Company and Russian cartographers, commercial tensions related to HBC attempts to deceive the Royal Navy to block settlement (long enough to get control of properties for future sale?), and the Imperial Parliament’s 1857 inquiry into continuance of the HBC Royal Charter awarded in 1650; all bound up with the strangely conflicting dual-hatted duties and ambitions of Governor and HBC Chief Factor (call him “Senior VP”) Douglas (1843-59) and Surveyor-General Pemberton (HBC Surveyor-General & Engineer, 1853-59); all happening during the local shift from sailing ship to ironclad and the 3-6 month duration of travel back to England – and the methods of communication to deal with this (1 original and copies, sent by different ships).

A short note about the 1856 map is in our society newsletter — check it out for caving pictures! I suspect the Crown paid for the survey but HBC kept back details. And if so, is the UK National Archives the rightful owner of the 1856 original? Or local First Nations if HBC was trespassing? Some years later, Pemberton gave Richards a copy (tracing) of the map – to spark a favourable impression? What a can of worms! Further research is on the backburner as I pursue new business activities.

The marvelous aspect is that the original trail got used for centuries by foot and pack animal (First Nations’ traders, HBC fur traders, colonial era Crown employees and settlers) but never by wagons or industrial era transport, and lost to memory sometime during the 1880s.

Thus the bigger picture:
Proposing that we creating a small National Park on Vancouver Island to protect the trail and to grow economic spin-offs for the Island’s central coast region:
  • [Link] 01 – Enoksasant National Park 2017-2021 idea sketch
  • [Link] 02 – 1856 (clip) & 1872 (entire) maps + updated business links sketch
  • [Link] 03 – High-level image of proposed park at Horne Lake
  • [Link] 04 – Strata-level image of proposed park at Horne Lake

An Aquedam for BC Hydro’s Site C ?

pont_du_gard_oct_2007An Aquedam for BC Hydro’s Site C ?
Could a modified design prevent generations of market jitters?

Hydroelectric dam engineers face an incredible dilemma. Hydro dams generate renewable energy but destroy natural ecosystems. Forcing government to make a hard choice, often presented as: ‘developing the renewable energy supply’ vs. ‘protecting and sustaining the ecosystem’. In British Columbia, the contentious “Big Dam/Big Lake” Site C design produces the same dilemma. It will produce irrevocable ecosystem damage, but might go ahead if courts accept the provincial argument that energy supply and future export sales are more important [Note 1]. Objectors are taking the case to higher courts, and the Province is moving forward; pushed by political pressures to force a fait accompli – a locked-in project – on the federal court, despite the court’s demonstrated willingness to block projects of similar magnitude. We could wait to see what happens. But is this prudent?

What if a modified design removes the conflict?
Could it create incentive for a new dam partnership?
Could the partnership – of former opponents – grandfather all approvals done to date?

final-sketch

Aquedam Concept: David Huer
Solidworks Drawings: Matej Borovec https://www.fiverr.com/borohot

An aqueduct atop bridge piers, with penstocks, turbines, and generators located inside each pier. Sourcing water from a higher elevation upstream, through a pipeline, to an elevated feeder pond at the design-height needed to achieve proper head, for feeding down into powerhouses spaced across the river.

site-map2Inspired by Roman aqueducts, British Columbia’s open-lattice railroad bridges, and the magnificent curved structures of London, England’s tidal barrier.

10oct2016-inspired-videosCould this design …
Achieve the same head elevation and power production as a “big wall” design, without destroying the valley economy, treaty lands, businesses, farms, and natural ecosystem?

Aquedam Front ViewRight Angled View


 

 

 

 

 

And elsewhere? Could the design be as10-34-5026useful where dam designers face the same dilemma?

Growing return-on-investment. Avoiding decades of costly volatility – legal, political, and armed conflict – for hundreds of future hydroelectric projects across British Columbia, across Canada and around the world.

* Any engineering company worth its salt understands the business opportunity.
* Insurers, financiers, investors and bond markets will value the minimized risk.
* Local people will save their valleys, their treaty rights, wetlands, forests, and farms.
* Contractors and vendors get their construction jobs, fed by the farmers in the valley.
* And utilities will get their exportable power.

new-rend-962-transparent-flow-through

Aquedam Transparent View

 

 

 

 

 


British Columbia’s challenge, now, is that we may need a particular type of leadership.

Leaders who can switch directions. Leaders who simultaneously lead for the betterment of local ridings and industry and the Province and the Nation. For now, and for future generations.

This may be the biggest challenge – Asking our leaders to put political capital on the table.

But what if they could?


logo-bchydroNote 1: BC Hydro will expropriate and flood 80 km of forests, farms and homes, and 7,000 acres of Class 1 and 2 agriculture land.


meeting-pixels-com-cc0Note 2: Project Management steps could include:

* Site C – site approved;
* Site C – works completed to date – approved;
* Site C – all associated construction and works continue;
* The Court acts as a neutral body managing pre-design negotiations;
* Sheriffs of the Court administer adherence to agreement;
* Dam Re-design & Pipeline Design – pre-agreed by stakeholders with standing;
* All other existing Site C studies and approvals grandfathered into agreement;
* Stakeholders establish Dam & Pipeline “Redesign Delivery” target due date;
* Stakeholders establish Dam & Pipeline “Construction Start” target due date;
* BC Hydro issues new design upgrade contract tenders;
* Construction, with new design, commences at or near Construction Start target date;
* BC Hydro and Destination BC commence world-wide campaign to teach the new design.


Images:

Logos on Dam: Included as part of public policy commentary and assumed to be a fair use application. Please advise with a message through my linkedin page whether a logo should be removed.

London Barrier: By mattbuck (category) (Own work by mattbuck.) [CC BY-SA 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0), CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0) or CC BY-SA 4.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)], via Wikimedia Commons https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/c/c0/London_MMB_%C2%BB127_Thames_Barrier_and_%22Avontuur_IV%22.jpg

Pont du Gard, Roman Empire: 14 October 2007, 10:07:27, Author: Emanuele. This image, which was originally posted to Flickr.com, was uploaded to Commons using Flickr upload bot on 23:55, 13 February 2012 (UTC) by Prioryman (talk). On that date it was licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Generic license. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Pont_du_Gard_Oct_2007.jpg

CPR bridge (black) in foreground, CNR bridge (orange arch) in background (with CPR train on it): Photo facing upriver. https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/common/9/92/Canadian_Pacific_Railway_train_crossing_Fraser_River_on_Cisco_bridge_at_Siska%2C_British_Columbia_%282010-Jun-13%29.jpg By Michael Frei (Michael Frei) [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html) or CC BY-SA 4.0-3.0-2.5-2.0-1.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0-3.0-2.5-2.0-1.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Earth image: Astronaut Photograph AS10-34-5026. NASA. Public Domain. http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/Features/EarthPerspectives/page2.php

Meeting: https://www.pexels.com/photo/meeting-pencils-macbook-notebooks-40120/ via Creative Commons-CC0 License

And the answer is . . . Taiwan

dhuer-title-crs-iconMy most recent venture
Outline [Link].
Summary/business model [Link].

Can foreigners become citizens of Mainland China to invest in domestic Mainland companies?

The Answer looks to be Yes.

In Spring 2015, China clarified the Corporation Law to close the V.I.E. contracts loophole – explicitly forbidding investing and control of domestic companies by foreigners.

In many countries, corporations are defined as legal “persons”. My strategy was to profit from the ambiguous relationship between Taiwan and PRC with a strategy to benefit China, Taiwan, the UK, and Foreign Investors. The method was to create a Taiwan-based Compliance Brokering Entity – registering foreigner investors as Taiwanese corporations – defining them in law as Chinese “persons”.

dhuer-china-taiwan-ambiguity-opportunity

vs. the apparently-most-possible of the allegedly impossible

Colossal_octopus_by_Pierre_Denys_de_MontfortYesterday, one of my friends (founder) asked why I don’t start easier ventures? The reason relates to the framing (and re-framing) of the challenge: No matter what I think about, it has been my experience that the leap-frogging steps of a disruption are nearly always seen as impossible/hard to comprehend . . . 

. . . (and in this, it appears not so much that the barrier is a belief in the “impossibility”, but that the person cannot intellectually follow or comprehend how I got there and ego seems to get in the way).

So, if whatever I do is seen this way, then (perhaps paradoxically) it makes more sense to me to do the biggest scariest monster.

Because this takes exactly the same effort as the apparently-most-possible of the allegedly impossible.

Not to mention massively satisfying.


Image: Pen and wash drawing by malacologist Pierre Dénys de Montfort, 1801, from the descriptions of French sailors reportedly attacked by such a creature off the coast of Angola. Public Domain, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kraken

The Door to $Capital Heaven

us-mission-vancouver

A country’s embassies and consulates are that nation’s territory, subject to its laws, rules, and customs.

Some time ago, I asked the US State Department to create an incubator inside the Vancouver consulate.

Every day, I could walk to my office in America without having to leave Canada. An embassy official appreciated the creativity but said no dice.

Hence the “Border Entrepreneur Visa” proposal, posted earlier this week: http://davehuer.com/blog/replacing-the-us-eb-1-and-e-1-with-a-be-1-visa/

 

 

 


Image: Seal of the US Consulate, Vancouver, BC. Public Domain: https://www.flickr.com/photos/us_mission_canada/4770405952 – https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

9 Minds for the Future

5-minds-for-the-future2Howard Gardner misses 4 mindful intelligences when he talks about the 5 Minds for the Future that he believes are “the specific cognitive abilities that will be sought and cultivated by leaders in the years ahead”.

Mr. Gardner’s list:

The Disciplinary Mind (DM): the mastery of major schools of thought, including science, mathematics, and history, and of at least one professional craft.

The Synthesizing Mind (SM): the ability to integrate ideas from different disciplines or spheres into a coherent whole and to communicate that integration to others.

The Creating Mind (CM): the capacity to uncover and clarify new problems, questions, and phenomena.

The Respectful Mind (RM): awareness of and appreciation for differences among human beings and human groups.

The Ethical Mind (EM): fulfillment of one’s responsibilities as a worker and as a citizen.

Los_Angeles_Pollution-cropped

Photo by DAVID ILIFF. License: CC-BY-SA 3.0

But this is a scientific model of the world: an idealized model of a civilized world of thinkers atop the hierarchy of civilization. It is not the world we live in. Not the world our children face:

A warming world, with melting ice caps, ice-free polar seas, and an interrupted tropic-arctic ocean heat conveyor belt. A world of sea-level rise, and drowned cities, and desperate populations. A world of rising starvation and denuded oceans. And refugees and internment camps. This is the world that every one of our grandchildren face. A world needing additional forms of Mindfulness if we are to succeed in restoring the biosphere.  Here are four to add to the mix:

KanjisenkiThe Warrior Mind (WM): combining strategic, tactical and artistic sensibilities. Miyamoto Musashi is the archetype. And my personal example is a US Marine. A man whose best friend died on the battlefield. A man who honoured that friend by not forgetting, and instead helping to set up a foundation for wounded warriors in his memory. This is a mind that frames its actions with honour. We need this mind.

The Profiting Mind (PM): looking for ways to earn profit in all its forms (financial, triple bottom line, personal). We need minds like this, too. To re-frame capitalism so it works for every species that inhabits the Earth.

The Earth Mind (EaM):  awareness of and appreciation for differences among different species of the earth, human and non-human, and the interrelatedness of all species in the biosphere we call home. We need this mind, too. Because this mind recognizes that all of us are one connected system that is failing because we have brought the ecosystem out of balance.

And the Horizon Mind (HM): The capacity to not just imagine the future, but to re-frame that future to make it better, and figure out the way from here to there. We need this mind to see where we could go, and to cut away every old way of thinking that got us into the hole we are now.


At times, I wonder if a Horizon Mind–and Horizon Intelligence–synthesizes all of the others? And whether Horizon Intelligence is both singularly personal and the collective intelligence of our species?

And whether Horizon Intelligence develops like this . . .?


When our children are born, they look out upon a strange and scary place.

All thinking is internal . . .

david huer-reframing space-update-001crop

The questing mind moves out from that internal space

Learning to involve sensory feedback: a mother’s breast milk, being singed, standing and falling, toy-making and using and breaking. Shitting and stinking, and eating boogers, and saying “No!”.

A sensory (feeling-seeing-scenting-tasting-thinking) feedback loop . . .

david huer-reframing space-update-002crop

But then, the questing human mind extends that feedback loop.

And here are the interesting questions . . .

Does the questing mind extend that feedback beyond others (mum, dad, sibling, grandma, the family dog) to wider horizons? Seeking to frame the horizon as a future that can be re-framed, changed, to whatever we want it to be;

This “horizon re-framing mind” — this Horizon Intelligence–perhaps it is the vista-seeking mind that makes our species gain the bigger perspective?

 

david huer-reframing space-update-003crop

And perhaps, it is Horizon Intelligence that synthesizes all of the other intelligences into one? Making the sum of the parts that which makes us aware? That makes us planners and doers of our own destiny?

 

david huer-reframing space-update-004crop

And if so, is it this intrinsic quality of thinking-being-contemplating-doingness that Information Technology kills? The “thrumming guitar pluck”, the quiet humming golden thread–that IT muffles and snuffs out?  The missing quality that we cannot replicate?

david huer-reframing space-update-005crop

Are we losing our Horizon Intelligence?

And if we are, are we becoming the Artificial Intelligence we should be afraid of?

— David Huer



Images:

5 Minds for the Future: Book Cover via Amazon Books:
Calligraphy by Miyamoto Musashi. Public Domain: Mr. Granger
Los_Angeles_Pollution: Photo by DAVID ILIFF. License: CC-BY-SA 3.0
All other images and artwork: © 2015 David Huer. Photo is of Sombrio Beach on the west coast of Vancouver Island.

The Unmentioned Details of the Entrepreneurial Journey

Having read Peter Baskerville‘s brilliantly dispassionate, no-nonsense answer to Why do most café startups fail? at Quora this morning, I thought my readers might like to see a re-post of a 2010 cartoon about the perils of venturing anew.

Never give up! Never Surrender!

Best for the day and this New Year. 

01 January 2015

– David Huer

huer-unmentioned-details-jan2015-001